Abrasive Blasting

Abrasive blasting is the process of propelling a stream of abrasive materials against a surface to affect a change in said surface. The abrasive media is propelled by a pressurized fluid, most commonly compressed air; a centrifugal wheel is sometimes used for propulsion. Abrasive blasting can be used to smooth a rough surface, roughen a smooth surface, remove surface contaminants, or change the shape of the surface.

A wide range of abrasive media are used for abrasive blasting, including, but not limited to: silica sand, garnet, crushed nut shells or fruit seeds/kernels, corn starch, sodium bicarbonate, dry ice, steel grit, zinc shot, and cut wire.

Abrasive blasting can be performed with portable equipment or in blast cabinets or larger blast rooms. Mobile abrasive blasting equipment is typically powered by a gas- or diesel-fueled engine, and includes an air compressor, one or more blast pots containing the abrasive media, and a blasting “gun” used by the operator to deliver the media to the desired area. Blast cabinets are small, enclosed cells in which the workpiece is placed. Operators generally administer blasting manually by placing their arms through gloves attached to the cabinet, and view the process through a small window. Blast rooms are larger versions of blast cabinets, with the operator stationed outside the room and running the process via automation. Blast cabinets and blast rooms have the benefit of easy recycling of the blasting media, as it is contained within the systems.

There are multiple variations of abrasive blasting, including sand blasting, bead blasting, and shot blasting.

Abrasive Blasting Providers: 

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